Improved Swift support for Highlight.js

Hi everyone,

I'm happy to report that versions 10.6 and 10.5 of highlight.js include significant improvements to its Swift rendering. These improvements concern keywords, built-ins, operators, attributes, implicit parameters, property wrappers, raw strings, string interpolation, generic parameters and arguments, operator declarations, and precedence groups.

I've also added a large test suite, but more tests are welcome, as are improvements to the themes.

Enjoy!

Note that I am not a maintainer of HLJS, only a user/contributer. HLJS was the easiest highlighting option for me to integrate into my writing/publishing setup. However, its Swift support was quite basic and I encountered many issues with it, so I ended up rewriting and expanding it. Because what better way to spend your holiday break than to write regular expressions in JavaScript :sweat_smile:

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Thank you for contributing!

I wonder why highlighters aren't using TextMate Language Grammars since they are pretty much a "standard" nowadays (they are used in Atom and VS Code and their parsing algorithm is probably 100% written in JavaScript too). It would reduce a lot maintaining costs.

As a side note, do we know which highlighter is used in these forums? Its highlighting algorithm is pretty much broken, since c is for some reason highlighted differently:

let a = 1
let b = 2
let c = 3

Edit: it's HLJS :slight_smile:

Because the TextMate grammar is massive (MBs not KBs) and too large to be acceptable for client-side rendering. The HLJS grammar will never offer the same detailed highlighting as TextMate, because its size has to be constrained.

Yes, c was listed as a built-in for some reason. Maybe there once was a Standard Library function with that name?
This is one of the issues I fixed, so when this forum updates to a newer version of HLJs, that issue should be resolved.

The highlighting for c is because of @convention(c), IIRC.

Ah, that makes sense :slight_smile:

The new grammar for attributes also handles these arguments, so the c will still be highlighted:

Speaking for myself, when reading and writing posts on these forums, I would much prefer that ā€œcā€ should never be highlighted in code blocks.

If someone writes @convention(c) I want the ā€œcā€ a normal color, and if someone writes let c = 2 I definitely want the ā€œcā€ a normal color.

I never want to see ā€œcā€ any color other than normal.

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