Server swift develop

I mean, swift on the server side. And I always feel that the official does not pay attention to the development of swift on the server side, almost no promote.

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I would say that server side swift and swift as a cross platform language has two big problems:

  • A lot of developers don't know that swift is able to run outside of apple platforms, I think the reason is because swift's releases are super tied to apple platforms for that reason developers from other technologies aren't paying attention about what's going on with swift, lot of them keep the idea of swift as an apple language made it just for for apple platforms.

  • The people who knows that swift can run on Linux they found the tooling isn't great. Just install swift on Linux is kind of hard (at least for someone that just want to learn and try make a simple program), editors experience aren't great either if you want to use sourcekit-lsp you need to compile it (at least for now) so for Linux users it's kind of easy to give up to use swift, and if we talk about Windows, well there are a lot of progress but still we don't know if one day will be official supported or what is the roadmap for this, means devs that use Windows I think wouldn't bother to at least try swift right know.

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Both good points, yes.

There's also a a free really cross-platform/multi-platorm Swift compiler (disclaimer, I'm involved with RemObjects, the company that creates it), which lets you build Swift for .NET, Java, Android (NDK/SDK), native Linux and Windows. Imho building on something like .NET (Core) is a much better foundation for server dev than starting from scratch.

Comes with great Swift IDEs for Mac and Windows, too.

You can find more at https://www.swifteverywhere.com — let us know what you think!

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This link fails to open in Safari and Chrome.

My apologies, it seems then non-HTTPS redirect didn't work properly, fixed now. Thanx!

Can this thread be locked, it is both not a pitch, and now wildly off topic.

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I believe it was confirmed somewhere that Apple are using Swift on production servers. I don't think it was mentioned specifically which services are implemented with Swift, but you can assume they don't invest in Swift and SwiftNIO to use it for "small / local / private projects".

I agree that more work needs to be done for Swift's ecosystem, though. I convinced the company I work at to write our next microservice with Swift - there were concerns, such as how many people were comfortable with Swift, and what happens if somebody else needs to maintain it, etc (they mostly use Node/Javascript). Anyway, I convinced them, only to immediately stumble because there isn't a good RabbitMQ client for Swift (that I could find). The official Swift client is built on Objective-C (i.e. for iOS apps), so there's no chance of getting it to work on a linux server. IIRC, there was also no way to work with Apache Parquet files. I tried to use the Python bridge to work around some of those issues, but as the work started building up (before I could even begin my actual project), I conceded defeat. I mean, come on... no RabbitMQ client? That's kind of basic.

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Closing this, since this post is not a pitch and is rambling.

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